Thinking skills and personal Capabilities Foundation stage (Pre Kg to Kg Sr) Pupil should: Class 1 to 5 Pupil Should: Class 6 to 12 Pupil should:
Managing Information • work with a focus, asking and responding to questions to clarify the task;

• select, with help, information from materials and resources provided and suggest ways to obtain information;

• follow directions in relation to a task;

• begin to plan;

• identify and use simple methods to record information;

• ask more focused questions about the task, clarifying purpose and what needs to be done;

• recognize where similar tasks have been done in the past;

• use their own and others’ ideas to identify, locate and select various sources of information;

• set goals for their work, break tasks into smaller parts and plan the next steps;

• record information in a variety of formats;

• begin to identify audience and purpose when communicating;

• be able to ask deeper and wider questions to clarify the task, to plan and to set goals;

• begin to challenge conventions and assumptions;

• be able to classify, compare and evaluate information and to select the most appropriate

methods for the particular task;

• develop methods for collating and recording information and monitoring progress on a task;

• have a sense of audience and purpose;

Thinking, Problem-Solving and Decision Making • show their ability to memorise by recalling and restructuring experiences and stories;

• make close observations and provide descriptions of what they notice;

• show the ability to sequence and order events and information, and to see wholes and parts;

• identify and name objects and events as same/different, and sort and put objects into groups;

• make simple predictions and see possibilities;

• give opinions and reasons;

• ask different types of questions;

• show their understanding by organising and summarising;

• sequence, order and rank along different dimensions;

• identify similarities and differences by making simple comparisons and connections;

• begin to test predictions and to look for evidence;

• make decisions and generate options;

• suggest possible solutions to problems;

• be systematic and work through the stages in a task;

• explain their methods and opinions, and the reasons for choices and actions;

• recognise the differences between why, what, where, when and how questions;

• show the ability to use memory strategies to deepen understanding and comprehension;

• identify and order patterns and relationships through a range of strategies such as grouping, classifying and reclassifying, comparing and contrasting;

• make and test predictions, examine evidence and make links between possible causes and effects;

• discriminate between fact and opinion and question the reliability of evidence;

• explain and justify methods, opinions and conclusions;

• understand more than one point of view;

• examine options and weigh up pros and cons;

• try alternative problem-solving solutions and approaches;

• use different types of questions systematically and with purpose;

Being Creative • be curious and ask questions about the world around them, using all the senses to explore and respond to stimuli;

• talk about their memories and experiences;

• play for pleasure and as a form of creative expression;

• show excitement, enjoyment and surprise in learning;

• be willing to take on new challenges;

• experiment with ideas through writing, drawing, mark making and model making;

• show curiosity when approaching new tasks and challenges;

• have experiences with all the senses;

• listen to and share ideas and experiences;

• generate as many ideas and options as possible, building and combining ideas;

• take time to use imagination for enjoyment;

• enjoy the unexpected, unusual and surprising;

• experiment and investigate real life issues;

• pose questions that do not have straightforward answers, seek out problems to solve and challenge the routine method;

• see opportunities in mistakes and failures;

• use all the senses to stimulate and contribute to ideas;

• experiment with different modes of thinking (for example visualisation);

• learn from and build on their own and others’ ideas and experiences;

• value other people’s ideas;

• experiment with objects and ideas in a playful way;

• make ideas real by experimenting with different designs, actions and outcomes;

• begin to develop their own value judgments about the merits of their work;

Working with Others • be willing to join in;

• learn to work and play co- operatively;

• develop routines of listening,

turn-taking, sharing, co-operating and reaching agreement;

• be able to learn from demonstration and modeling;

• be aware of how their actions can affect others;

• learn to behave and to use words to suit different purposes;

• develop confidence in being with adults and other pupils in a variety of contexts;

• develop further the habits of collaborative learning;

• become more adept at turn- taking, sharing and co-operating when working in a group or team;

• decide what needs to be done in a group and take responsibility for aspects of the work;

• show the ability to learn from shared and modeled activities;

• adapt behaviour and language to suit different situations;

• show fairness to others;

• recognise and respect other people’s feelings and ideas;

• become more independent in their social and interpersonal skills;

• show that they can work in different roles in a group and take responsibility for appropriate tasks;

• be willing to help others with their learning;

• understand and learn to respond to feedback;

• work with their peers to reach agreements and begin to manage disagreements;

Self-Management • talk about what they are doing and what they have learned;

• develop the ability to focus, sustain attention and persist with tasks;

• develop awareness of emotions about learning, their likes and dislikes;

• be able to make choices and decisions; and

• ask an adult or friend for help.

• check that they are achieving their purpose by talking about what they are learning, how the work was carried out and some aspect that might be improved;

• check their work routinely for accuracy and precision;

• persist with tasks until an appropriate endpoint, with teacher prompting;

• seek help from other people;

• work towards personal targets identified by the teacher; and

• develop an awareness of what they enjoy and what they find difficult, their personal strengths and limitations.

• evaluate what they have learned and compare their approaches with others;

• make links between their learning in different contexts;

• become self-directed by working on their own or with a group;

• learn ways to manage their own time;

• seek help from a variety of sources;

• work towards personal targets identified by themselves or jointly with the teacher; and

• be more confident in their knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses.